This is the "Home" page of the "Colorado Law Project: Small Claims Resources" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Colorado Law Project: Small Claims Resources   Tags: colorado, small claims  

Last Updated: Nov 17, 2012 URL: http://libguides.law.du.edu/smallclaims Print Guide RSS Updates

Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Important! Please Read

The information on this site is provided as a service and should not be construed as legal or non-legal advice.

 

Users needing legal advice are strongly encouraged to seek the services of a qualified attorney.

How do I find a Lawyer?

Find-A-Lawyer is the  Colorado Bar Association's Online Attorney Member Directory. It is one way you can begin your search for a Colorado lawyer.   

The directory allows you to search by practice area, name, and location.

Google




Google Scholar

Scholarly information at your fingertips.

With Google Scholar you can "search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites."



 

Introduction

The purpose of this guide is to provide general information about Colorado small claims courts, general guidance, resources, and links to court forms.

Small claims courts, procedures for filing, serving participants in a case, and bringing a case in front of a small claims judge are all governed by Colorado statutes (laws) and the Colorado Rules for Small Claims Court. 

The Colorado Revised Statutes may be accessed online by clicking here or by searching for 'Colorado Revised Statutes' in Google or another Internet search engine.

A helpful resource that provides guidance and forms related to small claims actions in Colorado is the Colorado Judicial Branch's Small Claims Forms page. 

This page includes links to rules, forms, and the Small Claims Handbook. For those new to small claims, the Small Claims Handbook is an great place to start.

The guide identifies key areas and related resources and includes both print and free online resources.

Please remember that this guide is not an exhaustive list of materials or resources.

 

Searching the Web with Google

Google provides an easy to use search engine for finding information on the Internet. For example, you could search for "Small Claims" and Colorado to pull up some of the resources that are listed elsewhere in this guide. When using Google, or any other search engine, it is important to remember that you will find both reliable and unreliable sources of information.

The following questions will help you evaluate the reliability of information you find online.  

  • Is it an official government website? State and federal government websites generally include reliable information. Examples include websites hosted by state and federal agencies, courts, legislatures, etc. If the site's domain name ends in .gov, you can likely trust the information you find.    
  • Does the website provide information about its creators and its purpose? If detailed information about the site’s purpose and its creators is not provided, treat the site and its information with suspicion.
  • Is it a website for a well known non-profit or non-governmental organization (NGO)? Like government websites, well known non-profits and NGOs generally have reliable websites. If the site’s domain name ends in .org, you can probably trust the information you find.
  • Is contact information provided? Reputable organizations will provide a phone number or email address so that you can contact them for more information. If contact information is vague or is not included, be wary of the resources on that site.
  • Does the website’s content show an obvious bias or agenda? Information contained on websites designed to influence opinion or cater to a specific group, political party, or movement, may or may not be reliable. For these types of websites, it is advisable to further research your topic to verify the accuracy and veracity of the information you’ve found. 
  • Is the information current? Can you tell when the information was last updated? A good website will make this obvious. If you can’t tell, it’s better to look elsewhere.

Research Assistance

Profile Image
Colorado Law Project
 

Comments and Suggestions

Was this information helpful?

How useful is this page?
(1 = Not Useful, 5 = Very Useful!)

Additional comments:


Your Email:


Law Libraries

Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip